Study Guide

Ancient Mirrors of Womanhood - Chapter 23, Chicomecoatl Summary & Analysis

Merlin Stone
This Study Guide consists of approximately 82 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Ancient Mirrors of Womanhood.
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Chapter 23, Chicomecoatl Summary and Analysis

A celebration of the corn harvest honors Chicomecoatl, the Great Corn Mother. Three young girls are chosen as corn maidens: the youngest represents the baby corn sprouts, the middle girl represents the harvest at its midway point, and the oldest represents the day when the corn waves highest in the fields. Seven ears of corn are presented to Chicomecoatl so that she may bless them. The seven ears are stored and used to plant the next year's harvest. It is said that the corn is Chicomecoatl's son, Cinteotl, or Xipe Totec.

Just as Chicomecoatl watches over the harvest, she also watches over the women who have died in childbirth. These women are seen as heroes, having given their life for another life.

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This section contains 132 words
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Buy the Ancient Mirrors of Womanhood Study Guide
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