The Adventures of Tom Sawyer Social Concerns

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As in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, the characters in Tom Sawyer exhibit attitudes typical of the mid-nineteenth century. The stereotypical villain, Injun Joe, derives from the frontier figure of the violent and vengeful Native American, and black Americans are derivative of slave stereotypes. These elements should be recognized both for their negative connotations and their historical significance. Twain's realistic representation of his characters' attitudes should not be mistaken for his own attitude. The controversy surrounding The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn has produced substantial evidence of Twain's integrity: he intended much of what he wrote to reveal the inconsistencies in his characters' beliefs. By looking at society through the eyes of boys, who are supposedly more innocent than adults, Twain ridicules the weaknesses in adult values and behavior.

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This section contains 128 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy The Adventures of Tom Sawyer Study Guide
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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer from Novels for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.