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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer Essay | Critical Essay #2

This Study Guide consists of approximately 100 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.
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Critical Essay #2

In the following excerpt, Wolff asserts that Tom Sawyer is a protest against the female-dominated moral code of Twain's day and the lack of suitable masculine role models for boys.

Initially Twain had intended [The Adventures of Tom Sawyer] to be a kind of bildungsroman: as Justin Kaplan reports, it was to have had four parts - "'1, Boyhood & youth; 2 y[outh] & early man[hood]; 3 the Battle of Life in many lands; 4 (age 37 to [40?]).…'" Yet the finished novel shows no sign of this early intention. In fact, Twain writes his "conclusion" with a kind of defensive bravado: "So endeth this chronicle. It being strictly a history of a boy, it must stop here; the story could not go much further without becoming the history of a man." At least one reason for the author's decision may be found in the very nature of the world he was...

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This section contains 3,712 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Adventures of Tom Sawyer Study Guide
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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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