Study Guide

A History of Western Philosophy - Book 3: Chapter 30, John Dewey Summary & Analysis

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Book 3: Chapter 30, John Dewey Summary and Analysis

John Dewey, born in 1859 in New England was the most significant American philosopher, who influenced other philosophers, students, aesthetics, and political theory. He was liberal, generous, kind and hard working. His theories were mostly profound except for his substitution of "inquiry" for "truth".

He adhered to the traditions of New England liberalism. He taught philosophy and pedagogy at Chicago, also founding a progressive school. His books involved "The School and Society" published in 1899 that was his most influential writing. He considered other social and political questions that resulted in his visits to Russia and China. He supported to some extent the first World War and took part in the inquiry involving Trotsky, but didn't think that he should succeed Stalin.

He abandoned religion although never adhered to Marxism. His most important work pertained to instrumentalism...

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This section contains 746 words
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