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A History of Western Philosophy - Book 3: Chapter 28, Bergson Summary & Analysis

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Book 3: Chapter 28, Bergson Summary and Analysis

Henri Bergson was the most significant French philosopher of the current century. His influence was notable and included such people as William James and Whitehead. He rejected reason as dominating the world. Bergsonian irrationalism was used by Sorel in his book Reflections on Violence, justifying the aimlessness of revolutionary labor movement. It also affected Bernard Shaw, who under the influence of Bergson, wrote "Back to Methuselah".

Philosophies were divided according to methods they employed or their results. Methods involved 'empirical' or 'a priori' or results, such as 'realist' and 'idealist'. Bergson's philosophy fails to fit into either of these categories. Another manner of classification involved philosophies of feeling, such as those inspired by happiness or knowledge, and practical philosophies that involved the love of action.

Philosophies of feeling were mostly optimistic or pessimistic, while salvation philosophies involved...

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This section contains 589 words
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Buy the A History of Western Philosophy Study Guide
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