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A History of Western Philosophy - Book 3: Chapter 13, Locke's Theory of Knowledge Summary & Analysis

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Book 3: Chapter 13, Locke's Theory of Knowledge Summary and Analysis

John Locke (1637-1704) was the supporter of the Revolution of 1688. His main work was theoretical philosophy, such as the Essay Concerning Human Understanding published in 1690. In 1689 he published his First Letter on Toleration in Holland. In 1690 and 1692 he published two other letters, while his two Treatises on Government were published soon after 1689. He also wrote a book on Education published in 1693.

Locke's father was a Puritan, while he himself despised scholasticism and the Independents' fanaticism. He was a physician while his patron was Lord Shaftesbury. After Shaftesbury fell, he went to Holland with him, where he stayed until the Revolution. Before the revolution he wrote Essay on the Human Understanding, his most important book. His influence on the philosophy of politics was significant, and he should be considered the founder of...

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This section contains 533 words
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