Study Guide

A History of Western Philosophy - Book 3: Chapter 11, Leibniz Summary & Analysis

This Study Guide consists of approximately 121 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of A History of Western Philosophy.
This section contains 552 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the A History of Western Philosophy Study Guide

Book 3: Chapter 11, Leibniz Summary and Analysis

Leibniz (1646-1716) was industrious, temperate, but honest. He wrote for approbation, resulting in two systems of thought, such as optimistic and shallow as well as profound, Spinozistic, and logical. He was born towards the end of the Thirty Years' War. His father taught moral philosophy. He studied law, obtained a Doctor's degree at Altdorf, and started to work for the archbishop of Mainz. In 1684 he published his discovery of the infinitesimal calculus.

He learned a neo-scholastic Aristotelian philosophy, but became influenced by Cartesianism, the materialism of Gassendi, and later Spinoza. He abandoned scholastic schools, and was in service of the House of Hanover since 1673, while from 1680 he was their librarian at Wolfenbuttel, later being hired to write the history of Brunswick. He died in 1005.

His philosophy was part of the Monadology and the Principles of Nature and...

(read more from the Book 3: Chapter 11, Leibniz Summary)

This section contains 552 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the A History of Western Philosophy Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
A History of Western Philosophy from BookRags. (c)2016 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook