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A History of Western Philosophy - Book 3: Chapter 7, Francis Bacon Summary & Analysis

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Book 3: Chapter 7, Francis Bacon Summary and Analysis

Francis Bacon (1561-1626) found modern inductive method, and started logical systematization in scientific procedure, as the son of Nicholas Bacon, Lord Keeper of the Great Seal. His aunt was the wife of Sir William Cecil, who became Lord Burghley. He was adviser to Essex after being in Parliament.

He left Essex and in 1617, became the Keeper of the Great Seal, and in 1618, Lord Chancellor. He was then prosecuted for taking bribes. There were lax practices in legal profession at that time and bribes were common. He was imprisoned, banished from public life, and started writing books.

His most important books "The advancement of Learning" was modern and considered to include his saying "Knowledge is power" (Russell 1946, p. 432). His philosophy involved the utilization of science in gaining power over sources of nature. In his philosophy he...

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This section contains 408 words
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