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A History of Western Philosophy - Book 2: Chapter 14, Franciscan Schoolmen Summary & Analysis

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Book 2: Chapter 14, Franciscan Schoolmen Summary and Analysis

Franciscans refused to adhere to Saint Thomas and were less orthodox than Dominicans. Their most important philosophers were Roger Bacon, Duns Scotus, and William Occam, but Saint Bonaventura and Matthew of Aquasparta also contributed to philosophical thought in an important way.

Roger Bacon (ca. 1214-ca1294) was more appreciated in modern times, although he was more of a learned man than a philosopher. He considered science as part of black magic and he himself was accused of heresy and magic. The papal legate ordered him to write philosophy beneficial to the Pope. His writings hence involved Opus Majus, Opus Minus, and Opus Tertium. He attacked clerical ignorance in his book Compendium Studii Philosophiae in 1271, and was imprisoned for fourteen years. Soon after he was released, he died in 1292.

His learning was encyclopedic, he valued experiment, dealing...

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