Study Guide

A History of Western Philosophy - Book 1: Chapter 21, Aristotle's Politics Summary & Analysis

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Book 1: Chapter 21, Aristotle's Politics Summary and Analysis

Aristotle's politics betrayed various Greek prejudices but some of his principles were employed throughout the Middle Ages. He was mainly interested with City States while alluding to Egypt, Babylon, Persia and Carthage, failing to mention the effect that Alexander had on the world. His writing was more relevant to the modern world than the one that existed after he completed his work.

Aristotle dealt with the importance of the State as the highest community devoted to the highest good. The family was to be first built on the natural relation between man and woman, master and slave. A few families could make a village while several villages if self-sufficient could make a State. The State was to be more important than the family and the individual. Fully developed human society was a State that was...

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This section contains 617 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the A History of Western Philosophy Study Guide
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