Study Guide

A History of Western Philosophy - Book 1: Chapter 17, Plato's Cosmogony Summary & Analysis

This Study Guide consists of approximately 121 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of A History of Western Philosophy.
This section contains 598 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the A History of Western Philosophy Study Guide

Book 1: Chapter 17, Plato's Cosmogony Summary and Analysis

Plato described his cosmogony in the Timaeus, the only known dialogues translated into Latin in the Middle Ages. Apart from the summary of the Republic, there is also included the myth of Atlantis that was to be larger than Asia and Libya, and the history of the world as told by Timaeus, a Pythagorean astronomer

Unchanging matters were understood by intelligence and reason while changing matters through opinion. The world created by God was temporary and made according to the eternal pattern to reflect God. He made order out of disorder from the existing sphere. This doctrine differed from the Jewish and Christian religion, where God made the world out of nothing. Such world was to be a globe like an animal that moved in the only perfect motion of circle. Plato numbered the four...

(read more from the Book 1: Chapter 17, Plato's Cosmogony Summary)

This section contains 598 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the A History of Western Philosophy Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
A History of Western Philosophy from BookRags. (c)2016 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook