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A History of Western Philosophy - Book 1: Chapter 14, Plato's Utopia Summary & Analysis

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Book 1: Chapter 14, Plato's Utopia Summary and Analysis

Plato developed the construction of an ideal commonwealth in "The Republic". He came to the conclusion that rulers should be philosophers. Justice needed to be part of the state, but its features separately defined.

Plato's Utopia incorporates the division of citizens into two classes of commoners and guardians with political power. The small number of guardians, who were a separate class would perform legislative work. Education was to be divided into extensive music and gymnastics while culture achieved through gentlemen characterized by wealth, social prestige, and political power. Rigid censorship involved literature while gods with bad behaviour were excluded from literature, preserving only beneficial things that can be applied in a battle. Recognizing slavery as worse than death was part of it as was prohibition of laughter along with the impact of lust practiced by...

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