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A History of Western Philosophy - Book 1: Chapter 5, Parmenides Summary & Analysis

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Book 1: Chapter 5, Parmenides Summary and Analysis

Parmenides, as opposed to Heraclitus, claimed that nothing changes. He was born in Elea, Southern Italy and lived in the fifth century. His mysticism, common among the South Italian philosophers influenced both Socrates and Plato. Parmenides was influenced by Pythagoras and invented metaphysics that was based on logic. Parmenides regarded senses as conveying illusions. The only true being was One that was infinite, indivisible while also being an extended sphere present everywhere. His theories were part of the truth and part of opinion. According to him thought was part of meaning that had a physical form, representing objects that exist. As objects talked about existed, there was permanency in their existence. Both thought and language required representation that became imaginary if words were abstract. When talking of an imaginary person or thing, such as Hamlet or unicorns...

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