Elizabeth George Writing Styles in A Great Deliverance

Elizabeth George
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Point of View

The entirety of A Great Deliverance is written from the point of view of an omniscient narrator. This phenomenon is relatively standard in the novels of Elizabeth George. The use of an omniscient and objective narrator enables the author to set forth the story without the burden of editorial embellishment. In other words, the narrator does not interpret the information being given; the narrator simply lays out the plot, allowing the reader to come to his or her own conclusions as to what is happening. Also using an omniscient narrator means that none of the characters become more important than the story itself. Employing the voice of an omniscient narrator insures that plot lines are unencumbered by tangential information concerning the characters. Nor does the objective narrator voice privilege one character over another. Although it is true that Inspector Lynley and Sergeant Havers are the main...

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This section contains 945 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the A Great Deliverance Study Guide
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