Literary Precedents for Je ne parle pas francais

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The most obvious literary precedent for "Je ne parle pas francais" is Dostoyevsky's Letters from the Underworld (1864). In both works a self-absorbed man reveals his own nature, and both works end with stories from the narrator's past. When Mansfield's husband, John Middleton Murry, read the manuscript of the first part of the story, he wrote her, "It's utterly unlike any sensation I have ever yet had from any writing of yours, or any writing at all except Dostoyevsky's."

Another possible influence on this story might have been impressionist painters like Toulouse-Lautrec, Monet, Cezanne, Manet, and Matisse. Critic Rhoda B. Nathan has pointed out that the Paris Raoul Duquette inhabits is the Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec and that the technique of the story represents Mansfield's "attempt to do with language what the impressionists and post-impressionists were doing with brush and palette."

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This section contains 140 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Buy the Je ne parle pas francais Short Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
Je ne parle pas francais from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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