Women and Women's Writings from Antiquity Through the Middle Ages - Research Article from Feminism in Literature

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Notes

  1. Jill Mann, Geoffrey Chaucer (New York, 1991), 92.
  2. The Wife of Bath's Tale is a lai in the romance genre. Louise O. Fradenburg considers whether this makes it a "regressive fantasy" and finds that, conversely, it makes the Wife seem "progressive or modern" ("The Wife of Bath's Passing Fancy," Studies in the Age of Chaucer 8 [1986]: 31-58, at 34-35). Fradenberg observes that "The very escapism of romance thus points, paradoxically, to the genre's potential as an instrument for change" (41). Sarah Disbrow conversely finds the Wife's genre to be an "antiquated fairy tale" and proposes that the Wife is intended to be "an allegorical figure representing human carnality much like her male counterpart, January" ("The Wife of Bath's Old Wives' Tale," Studies in the Age of Chaucer 8 [1986]: 59-71, at 59-60). Disbrow speculates that, by giving this tale to the Wife, Chaucer "hoped to discredit Arthurian romance" (61). However, Chaucer is...

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This section contains 945 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Women and Women's Writings from Antiquity Through the Middle Ages Encyclopedia Article
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Feminism in Literature
Women and Women's Writings from Antiquity Through the Middle Ages from Feminism in Literature. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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