Valley Forge - Research Article from Americans at War

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 4 pages of information about Valley Forge.
This section contains 1,161 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
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Valley Forge

Between December 19, 1777, and June 19, 1778, the American Continental Army camped on about 2,000 acres of ground in a Pennsylvania community called Valley Forge, approximately twenty miles northwest of Philadelphia. While there, approximately 11,000 men under the command of General George Washington constructed light shelters and defensive earthworks, endured a harsh winter, trained, and executed rigorous military drills. Initially ignored by historians, the Valley Forge story was "rediscovered" during the mid-nineteenth century. Romantic Era authors emphasized the hardships of the encampment and caused it to be adopted as a national symbol of perseverance and sacrifice resulting in eventual triumph. Citizens joined efforts to preserve the campground where monuments and reconstructions were built during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries to interpret the story.

Deprivation and Renewal

No battles were fought at Valley Forge, but historians acknowledged the encampment as a turning point in the American Revolution because the troops...

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This section contains 1,161 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Valley Forge Encyclopedia Article
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Americans at War
Valley Forge from Americans at War. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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