Uzbekistan - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Religious Practices

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 14 pages of information about Uzbekistan.
This section contains 3,932 words
(approx. 14 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Uzbekistan Encyclopedia Article

Country Overview

Traditionally amicable relations have existed among the various religious communities of Uzbekistan. Beginning in the early twenty-first century, however, radical Islamic groups operating outside government structures distributed anti-Semitic literature, prompting some Jews of Uzbekistan to emigrate to Israel. Since the 1980s young Uzbeks have been drawn to what is called "political Islam," including such sects as Wahhabite and Hizb-u-Tahrir, as well as the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan and Taliban style extremist groups.

Islam Karimov, who had been Uzbekistan's Communist party chief in 1989, was elected president in September 1991. He began a crackdown against political opponents and established controls on Muslims. The Karimov government continues to perceive unauthorized Islamic groups as extremist security threats and forbids them. The level of corruption in the Karimov administration and the extreme poverty experienced since independence from the Soviet Union can perhaps explain the attraction of the young people to such...

(read more)

This section contains 3,932 words
(approx. 14 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Uzbekistan Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Encyclopedia of Religious Practices
Uzbekistan from Encyclopedia of Religious Practices. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook