Thomas Aquinas, St. (C. 1224-1274) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 45┬ápages of information about Thomas Aquinas, St. (C. 1224–1274).
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General Philosophical Position

In the main, Aquinas's philosophy is a rethinking of Aristotelianism, with significant influences from Stoicism, Neoplatonism, Augustinism, and Boethianism. It also reflects some of the thinking of the Greek commentators on Aristotle and of Cicero, Avicenna, Averroes, Solomon ben Judah ibn Gabirol, and Maimonides. This may suggest that we are dealing with an eclectic philosophy, but actually Aquinas reworked the speculative and practical philosophies of his predecessors into a coherent view of the subject that shows the stamp of his own intelligence and, of course, the influence of his religious commitment.

One of the broad characteristics of Aquinas's work in philosophy is a temperamental tendency to seek a middle way on questions that have been given a wide range of answers. This spirit of moderation is nowhere better illustrated than in his solution to the problem of universals. For centuries philosophers had...

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This section contains 13,334 words
(approx. 45 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Thomas Aquinas, St. (C. 1224-1274) Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Thomas Aquinas, St. (C. 1224-1274) from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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