The Far Planets - Research Article from Information Plus Reference Series

A. Scott Berg
This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 19 pages of information about The Far Planets.
This section contains 5,505 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
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Three Centuries of Discovery

It took three centuries for humans to uncover the far planets in our solar system. In the 1600s the telescope opened up new opportunities for observation. People learned that Jupiter and Saturn had moons and that Saturn had rings. The telescope also showed that wandering stars were not stars at all, because they did not generate their own light, but reflected light from the Sun.

No new planets were discovered during the 1600s. The far planets were still too distant and fuzzy to be recognized for what they were. Uranus was discovered in the late 1700s. Another century passed before the discovery of Neptune. Pluto, discovered in 1930 was the last planet found in the solar system.

Astronomers categorize planets based on geology and composition. Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars are called the terrestrial planets, because they are made of rock and metal. They...

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This section contains 5,505 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy The Far Planets Encyclopedia Article
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Information Plus Reference Series
The Far Planets from Information Plus Reference Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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