Swift, Jonathan (1667-1745) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 6┬ápages of information about Swift, Jonathan (1667–1745).
This section contains 1,773 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Swift, Jonathan (1667-1745) Encyclopedia Article

Religion and Morality

Never professing to be a philosopher, Swift was nevertheless a serious thinker on the problems of religion and morality; however, because of his pervasive use of irony, his writings in this area have not infrequently been misunderstood and maligned. Swift always maintained, and quite properly, that he was not attacking religion but the corruptions and excesses of religion and the abuses of reason. As dean, he performed all the functions of that office and was in every respect a sincere Christian. In his surviving sermons, only eleven of which are unquestionably authentic, he takes a commonsense (derived from the funded experience of humankind) approach to theology. The lingering Trinitarian controversy, which caused such bitterness and name-calling among the "orthodox" that Parliament prohibited further publication on the subject, Swift found thoroughly repugnant. In A Letter to a Young Gentleman, lately enter'd into Holy Orders (1720), Swift...

(read more)

This section contains 1,773 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Swift, Jonathan (1667-1745) Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Swift, Jonathan (1667-1745) from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook