Suicide - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Religion

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 20 pages of information about Suicide.
This section contains 5,717 words
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Ancient Greek and Roman Civilization

While the ancient Greek writers and philosophers did not consider suicide an action that would lead to a better existence, they did see it as an appropriate response to certain circumstances. The fact that Jocasta, the mother of Oedipus, chose to commit suicide upon learning of her incestuous relationship with her son was understood and appreciated by the ancients as an appropriate response to a disastrous situation. Heroic suicide in the face of a superior enemy and the choice of death to avoid dishonor or the agony of a lengthy terminal illness were accepted as justifiable actions. Through the voice of Socrates, Plato in his Phaedo did much to form the classical attitude toward suicide. Socrates himself chose to drink the hemlock, but he also affirmed the Orphic notions that humans are placed in a prison from which they may not release themselves and...

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This section contains 5,717 words
(approx. 20 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Suicide Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Religion
Suicide from Encyclopedia of Religion. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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