Stoicism - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 15 pages of information about Stoicism.
This section contains 4,485 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Stoicism Encyclopedia Article

Stoicism

Stoicism was a philosophical movement founded in Athens in the late fourth century BCE by Zeno of Citium. Although Stoicism was shaped by many philosophical influences (including the thought of Heraclitus), it was throughout its history an essential part of the mainstream Socratic tradition of ancient philosophy. Inspired as well by the Cynics (Zeno was taught by Crates, a student of Diogenes of Sinope), Stoicism developed alongside and in competition with Platonism and Aristotelianism over the next 500 years. For centuries it was the main rival to Epicurean thought as well. Virtually no works survive from the early period of the school's history. Yet its doctrines have been reconstructed with a fair level of reliability on the basis of later accounts, critical discussions by non-Stoics, and the surviving works of later Stoic writers.

History

When Zeno arrived in Athens, attracted from his home on Cyprus by Socratic...

(read more)

This section contains 4,485 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Stoicism Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Macmillan
Stoicism from Macmillan. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook