Social and Political Philosophy - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 12 pages of information about Social and Political Philosophy.
This section contains 3,433 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Social and Political Philosophy Encyclopedia Article

Libertarianism

Libertarians frequently cite the work of F. A. Hayek, particularly his Constitution of Liberty (1960), as an intellectual source of their view. Hayek argues that the libertarian ideal of liberty requires "equality before the law" and "reward according to market value" but not " substantial equality" or "reward according to merit." Hayek further argues that the inequalities due to upbringing, inheritance, and education that are permitted by an ideal of liberty actually tend to benefit society as a whole.

In basic accord with Hayek, contemporary libertarians, like John Hospers (1971), Robert Nozick (1974), Tibor Machan (2004), and Jan Narveson (1998), define liberty negatively as "the state of being unconstrained by other persons from doing what one wants" rather than positively as "the state of being assisted by other persons in doing what one wants." Libertarians go on to characterize their social and political ideal as requiring that each person should have...

(read more)

This section contains 3,433 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Social and Political Philosophy Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Social and Political Philosophy from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook