Shelley, Percy Bysshe (1792–1822) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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Shelley, Percy Bysshe(1792–1822)

Percy Bysshe Shelley is usually thought of as a romantic and lyric poet rather than as a philosophical one. He was, however, the author of a number of polemical prose pamphlets on politics and religion; and both his prose and his poetry reflect a coherent background of social and metaphysical theory.

In general, Shelley's beliefs are those of the radical English intelligentsia of the period immediately before and after the French Revolution, and in particular of William Godwin, who became his father-in-law. It has often been said that Shelley was really antipathetic to Godwin's atheism and determinism and that he gradually threw off Godwin's influence in favor of a more congenial Platonic transcendentalism. This view, however, seems to rest on a misunderstanding of both Godwin and Shelley.

Attack on Christianity

In The Necessity of Atheism, for which he was expelled from Oxford...

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This section contains 1,691 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Shelley, Percy Bysshe (1792–1822) Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Shelley, Percy Bysshe (1792–1822) from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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