Shape and Form of Plants - Research Article from Macmillan Science Library: Plant Sciences

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Contribution of the Stem

Growth Direction.

Stems are upright in most plants (such as corn or oak), growing away from gravity, but may be prostrate, as in creeping plants (e.g., creeping devil cactus), which grow at right angles to or without respect to gravity. Creeping stems of pot-grown plants may grow beyond the pot edge, down the side of the pot, and across the table the pot is on. This type of stem growth is contact dependent. The stems are not weak, but often quite stout. Stems of other shoots are lax (e.g., ivy), unable to support themselves, and their direction of growth is related to the availability of a host plant or a substrate to provide support.

The number, location, and growth angle of the branches regulate tree form. Stems growing in different orientations are frequently found on the same plant. Christmas...

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This section contains 2,155 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Shape and Form of Plants Encyclopedia Article
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Macmillan Science Library: Plant Sciences
Shape and Form of Plants from Macmillan Science Library: Plant Sciences. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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