Sequencing Dna - Research Article from Macmillan Science Library: Genetics

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 8 pages of information about Sequencing Dna.
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Overview

In 1977 two methods for sequencing DNA were introduced. One method, referred to as Maxam-Gilbert sequencing, after the two scientists at Harvard University who developed the technique, uses different chemicals to break radioactively labeled DNA at specific base positions. The other approach, developed by Frederick Sanger in England and called the chain termination method (also called the Sanger method), uses a DNA synthesis reaction with special forms of the four nucleotides that, when added to a DNA chain, stop (terminate) further chain growth.

By either method, a collection of single-stranded DNA fragments is produced, each fragment one base longer than the next. The length of a fragment depends on where a chemical cleaved the strand (in Maxam-Gilbert sequencing) or where a special terminator base was added (in the chain termination method). The fragments are then separated according to their size by a process called gel electrophoresis, in which...

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This section contains 2,223 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Sequencing Dna Encyclopedia Article
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Macmillan Science Library: Genetics
Sequencing Dna from Macmillan Science Library: Genetics. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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