Semiotics - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Communication and Information

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 4 pages of information about Semiotics.
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Origin of Semiotics

People have been interested in signs for many centuries. In fact, the first definition of "sign" was given by Hippocrates (460-377 B.C.E.), who treated it as a medical symptom (e.g., sore throat standing for a cold). After that, signs have been studied through the ages by such thinkers as Plato, Aristotle, St. Augustine, John Locke, and Immanuel Kant. However, it was only toward the end of the nineteenth century that semiotics was developed as a separate field, thanks to the works of Peirce, an American philosopher, and Ferdinand de Saussure, a Swiss linguist.

Conceptual Framework of Semiotics

The range of semiotics is very broad, but there are a number of concepts that are central to the field, including sign, code, medium, types of signs, and dimensions of signs.

There are two main conceptions of sign: dyadic, developed by de Saussure, and triadic, developed...

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This section contains 1,168 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Semiotics Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Communication and Information
Semiotics from Encyclopedia of Communication and Information. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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