Seed Dispersal - Research Article from Macmillan Science Library: Plant Sciences

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 6 pages of information about Seed Dispersal.
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Wind Dispersal

The simplest form of seed dispersal is by wind and, not surprisingly, wind-dispersed fruits in temperate areas usually develop in breezy spring months. The same species that are wind-pollinated in temperate areas often bear wind-dispersed seed such as maple (Acer in Aceraceae), willow and poplar (Salix and Populus in Salicaceae), and ash (Fraxinus in Oleaceae).

A pisonia plant's seed clings to the feathers of a black noddy on Heron Island, Australia. A pisonia plant's seed clings to the feathers of a black noddy on Heron Island, Australia.
Typically the wind-dispersed seeds are developed quickly and dispersed in the same season. Wind-dispersed tree species are numerous in the warm, moist forests of the tropics—especially for tall trees in areas where there is a slight to prominent dry season. The height of the tree is important to enable the diaspore to catch the wind currents. The shape of wind-dispersed diaspores is often critical to their dispersal as well. Maple seeds have a...

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This section contains 1,504 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Seed Dispersal Encyclopedia Article
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Macmillan Science Library: Plant Sciences
Seed Dispersal from Macmillan Science Library: Plant Sciences. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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