Scientific Revolutions - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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The Conception of Scientific Revolution in Traditional Philosophy of Science

To set the context for these debates, it is useful to begin with the ordinary concept of scientific revolution and understand why it lacks fundamental epistemological significance in traditional philosophy of science. In ordinary parlance, a scientific revolution is a large-scale change in the fundamental concepts, theories, or methods that scientists in some area of inquiry emply to understand the course of nature (e.g., the Copernican revolution in astronomy). Such a change is also thought to be revolutionary in so far as it provokes similarly dramatic alterations in the way laypeople see the world. As such, the notion is obviously important to historians of science and popular culture. On the other hand, scientific revolution is not a central topic for the tradition of logical positivism (more broadly, logical empiricism) that generates the key figures, problems, and models...

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This section contains 6,916 words
(approx. 24 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Scientific Revolutions Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Scientific Revolutions from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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