Science Fiction - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 12 pages of information about Science Fiction.
This section contains 3,508 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
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From Frankenstein to Brave New World

If, as several critics have argued, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus (1816) was the first true SF novel, the genre's founding text provides a paradigm of moral ambivalence toward the processes and products of scientific inquiry. Driven by an urge to unlock the secrets of nature, Victor Frankenstein is at once the genre's first heroic visionary and its first mad scientist. Indeed, these roles are inseparable: Frankenstein's bold commitment to unfettered experimentation makes him capable of both wondrous accomplishment—the creation of an artificial person endowed with superhuman strength and intelligence—and blinkered amorality. Unable to contain or control his creation, whose prodigious powers have been turned toward destructive ends, Frankenstein comes to fear that he has unleashed "a race of devils ... upon the earth, who might make the very existence of the species of man a condition precarious...

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This section contains 3,508 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Science Fiction Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics
Science Fiction from Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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