Schelling, Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Von (1775-1854) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 16┬ápages of information about Schelling, Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Von (1775–1854).
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Subjective Idealism

In the first stage Schelling was gradually working himself free from Fichte's subjective idealism to an independent position of his own. The major works of this phase were Vom Ich als Prinzip der Philosophie, oder über das Unbedingte im menschlichen Wissen (Tübingen, 1795), in which he posited the ego as the supreme, unconditioned element in human knowledge, and Philosophische Briefe über Dogmatismus und Kritizismus (in Philosophisches Journal, 1796), in which he compared Spinoza and Fichte. There is little that is original in these works other than the style and the tone. However, Schelling's style is important because its eloquence, its sense of emotional urgency, and its relative freedom from technical jargon—a rare trait in the writings of German idealists—all point to his affinity with the romantic movement and his unique philosophic stress on...

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This section contains 4,735 words
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Buy the Schelling, Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Von (1775-1854) Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Schelling, Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Von (1775-1854) from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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