Royce, Josiah (1855-1916) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 15┬ápages of information about Royce, Josiah (1855–1916).
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Philosophical Orientation

Royce's philosophy is a unique synthesis of the rationalist metaphysic we associate with the system builders in the Western philosophical tradition and the appeal to experience and practice that has been dominant in American philosophy since 1875. Royce is the best American representative of absolute idealism, although there are voluntaristic elements in his position that distinguish it from both the Hegelian position and the systems of the British idealists. Royce's theory of the will and his conception of its role in the knowledge process introduced novel features into the tradition of rationalistic idealism. Royce was aware of this fact and hence called his position absolute voluntarism or absolute pragmatism.

Royce's thought revolves around the problems raised by a religious view of reality. He sought to resolve them through a metaphysical system constructed with the aid of concepts drawn from a wide range of thought and experience...

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This section contains 4,310 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Royce, Josiah (1855-1916) Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Royce, Josiah (1855-1916) from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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