Routing - Research Article from Macmillan Science Library: Computer Sciences

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Static Routing

The simplest approach to routing is static routing. In this case each computer on the network has a fixed routing table. When a message is received, the computer checks the address of the message against the routing table and then forwards the message to whichever computer is indicated by the routing table. The routing table may include alternative entries to deal with the case where part of the network is currently unavailable.

Static routing requires very little processing power, which is considered an advantage. However, this simple solution has the disadvantage that it cannot adapt to current situations in the network. For example, parts of the network may become overloaded if too many messages are being transmitted. With static routing, no change will be made to the routing algorithm to take into account the overloading. It is possible to adapt to such an overload situation and route...

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This section contains 1,018 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Routing Encyclopedia Article
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Macmillan Science Library: Computer Sciences
Routing from Macmillan Science Library: Computer Sciences. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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