Rousseau, Jean-Jacques - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Religion

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 4 pages of information about Rousseau, Jean-Jacques.
This section contains 1,063 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Rousseau, Jean-Jacques Encyclopedia Article

ROUSSEAU, JEAN-JACQUES (1712–1778) was a Geneva-born author, social and educational theorist, and advocate of a nondogmatic religion of nature. Rousseau was a prolific writer; however, his mature religious thought is encapsulated in a comparatively short section, "The Profession of Faith of the Savoyard Vicar," of Émile (1762), his treatise in support of experientially based educational methods. The straightforward, somewhat serene tone of this famous statement stands in marked contrast to the complex, turbulent pattern of its author's life history.

Amid the natural beauties of the Alps, Rousseau's vicar, a simple, unpretentious country priest, recounts his efforts to resolve his doubts, stemming from the diversity of competing beliefs. Dissatisfied with the philosophers, of whom he says he is not one, he has found a basis for certitude and optimism in his own experience. This has convinced him, ultimately, of the presence of order in the universe, which is only...

(read more)

This section contains 1,063 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Rousseau, Jean-Jacques Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Macmillan
Rousseau, Jean-Jacques from Macmillan. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook