Role Theory - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Sociology

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 13 pages of information about Role Theory.
This section contains 3,789 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
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History, Differentiation, and Confusion

Role theory arose when social scientists took seriously the insight that social life could be compared with the theater, in which actors played predictable "rôles." This insight was pursued independently by three major contributors in the early 1930s with somewhat different agendas. For Ralph Linton (an anthropologist), role theory was a means for analyzing social systems, and roles were conceived as "the dynamic aspects" of societally recognized social positions (or "statuses"). In contrast, George Herbert Mead (a social philosopher) viewed roles as the coping strategies that individuals evolve as they interact with other persons, and spoke of the need for understanding others' perspectives ("role taking") as a requisite for effective social interaction. And Jacob Moreno (a psychologist) saw roles as the habitual, sometimes harmful, tactics that are adopted by persons within primary relationships, and argued that imitative behavior ("role playing") was...

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This section contains 3,789 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Role Theory Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Sociology
Role Theory from Encyclopedia of Sociology. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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