Religion, World War II - Research Article from Americans at War

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How Religious Groups Served Troops in World War I

During World War I religious groups were responsible for meeting not only the spiritual needs of the troops in training camps and overseas, but their recreational needs as well. Their aim was to foster the comfort and morale of servicemen and to keep them away from negative influences such as prostitution and gambling by providing social activities, entertainment, and "a home away from home." The major organizations involved in this work were the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA), the Knights of Columbus, the Jewish Welfare Board, and the Salvation Army. The programs conceived and developed by these organizations had a major impact on the well-being of American soldiers, sailors, and marines.

The YMCA, which had been serving troops since the Civil War, provided 90 percent of all social services (then called "welfare") to the American Expeditionary Forces in...

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This section contains 1,486 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Religion, World War II Encyclopedia Article
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Americans at War
Religion, World War II from Americans at War. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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