Reconstruction - Research Article from Americans at War

Eric Foner
This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 9 pages of information about Reconstruction.
This section contains 2,554 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Reconstruction Encyclopedia Article

Reconstruction

The aftermath of a long, hard war can be as arduous as the fighting itself. Such is the case with Reconstruction, one of the most volatile peacetime periods in American history. Rebel armies may have surrendered, but the Confederate people did not. The Republican Party in the North may have triumphed, but its power was not unrivaled. Black slaves may have gained their freedom, but they did not enjoy equality. The often violent political, social, and economic struggles that came to characterize Reconstruction should compel any student to consider it an extension of the Civil War. The effects of Reconstruction contributed to segregation (Jim Crow laws) and intense race conflict through most of the twentieth century. Reconstruction, like the Civil War, left a deep imprint on American society and culture.

Reconstruction scholarship exemplifies the period's restlessness. Historians have gone from condemning Reconstruction as a harsh form of punishment...

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This section contains 2,554 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Reconstruction Encyclopedia Article
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Americans at War
Reconstruction from Americans at War. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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