Radio Broadcasting, Station Programming And - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Communication and Information

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Radio Broadcasting, Station Programming And

Susan Eastman and her colleagues (1997) state very clearly that the business of broadcasting is "the business of creating audiences that advertisers want to reach" (p. 8). This focus originated in the 1920s when WEAF, a radio station owned by the American Telephone and Telegraph Company (AT&T), began "toll broadcasting" (i.e., the exchange of money for airtime). This led to sponsorships of blocks of programs, such as the "Palmolive Hour" and the "Mercury Theater." It was not long before sponsorships progressed to shorter, more frequent announcements.

Radio advertising became even more attractive with the rise of networks. AT&T initiated this trend by linking its stations by using its existing telephone infrastructure. The telephone company soon left the broadcasting industry, selling its holdings to the Radio Corporation of America (RCA). As a result, RCA created a new company...

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This section contains 2,692 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Radio Broadcasting, Station Programming And Encyclopedia Article
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Radio Broadcasting, Station Programming And from Encyclopedia of Communication and Information. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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