Qabbalah - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Religion

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 19 pages of information about Qabbalah.
This section contains 5,514 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Qabbalah Encyclopedia Article

Historical Survey

The first written evidence of the existence of theosophical and theurgical thought in Judaism comes from Provence, in southern France, in the second half of the twelfth century. A series of well-known halakhic authorities, beginning with Avraham ben David of Posquières and Yaʿaqov the Nazirite and later including Moses Nahmanides and his principal student, Shelomoh ben Avraham Adret, were full-fledged qabbalists, though their literary output in Qabbalah was minimal compared to their voluminous halakhic writings. Doubtless this situation is the result of a deliberate policy to keep Qabbalah an esoteric lore limited to a very small elite. However, at the beginning of the thirteenth century, the veil of esotericism began to disappear. Yitsḥaq Sagi Nahor (Yitsḥaq the Blind), Avraham ben David of Posquières's son, is known as the teacher of several qabbalists...

(read more)

This section contains 5,514 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Qabbalah Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Encyclopedia of Religion
Qabbalah from Encyclopedia of Religion. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook