Professions - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Sociology

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 14 pages of information about Professions.
This section contains 4,037 words
(approx. 14 pages at 300 words per page)
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Professions

The idea of a "profession" did not exist in ancient times. Although there were people who did what is currently denoted as professional work, these "professionals" often labored in dependent positions. For example, physicians in the Roman Empire were slaves in wealthy households, and architects worked as salaried public employees. Lawyers in ancient Greece were merely friends of the litigants who spoke before a gathering of their peers. Neither lawyers nor physicians received formal training (Carr-Saunders and Wilson 1937). By medieval times, the three classic professions—medicine, law, and the clergy (which included university teaching)—began to approximate more closely the modern conception of professions. With the development of universities, then under religious auspices, would-be professionals completed lengthy training in their chosen fields. They also began to constitute a new class of intellectuals. As society increasingly secularized, the professions emerged from under religious control and began to...

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This section contains 4,037 words
(approx. 14 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Professions Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Sociology
Professions from Encyclopedia of Sociology. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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