Poseidon - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Religion

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 3 pages of information about Poseidon.
This section contains 681 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
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Poseidon

POSEIDON is the ancient Greek god who embodies primitive power—the power of the untamed, the brutal, the wild. His name, which has not yet been convincingly explained, occurs on clay tablets from Pylos dating from the period preceding the destruction of Mycenaean civilization (1200 BCE). The god thus belongs to the older strata of Greek religion. His exact place in the Mycenaean pantheon is unknown, but he seems to have been more important that Zeus, who was the most prominent Greek god in the Classical period. The tablets of Pylos also mention the Posidaion (a sanctuary most probably located within the city of Pylos) and a goddess Posidaeja (possibly Poseidon's wife, though she is not heard of in later times).

In the Classical period, Poseidon was mainly connected with the sea, earthquakes, the horse, and men's associations. In Homer's Iliad, most...

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This section contains 681 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Poseidon Encyclopedia Article
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Macmillan
Poseidon from Macmillan. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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