Population Genetics - Research Article from Macmillan Science Library: Genetics

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 5 pages of information about Population Genetics.
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Gene Pool and Genetic Structure

All of the alleles shared by all of the individuals in a population make up the population's gene pool. In diploid organisms such as humans, every gene is represented by two alleles. The pair of alleles may differ from one another, in which case it is said that the individual is "heterozygous" for that gene. If the two alleles are identical, it is said that the individual is "homozygous" for that gene. If every member of a population is homozygous for the same allele, the allele is said to be fixed. Most human genes are fixed and help define humans as a species.

The most interesting genes to geneticists are those represented by more than one allele. Population genetics looks at how common an allele is in the whole population and how it is distributed. Imagine, for example, an allele "b" that when...

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This section contains 1,297 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Population Genetics Encyclopedia Article
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Macmillan Science Library: Genetics
Population Genetics from Macmillan Science Library: Genetics. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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