Physiology, History Of - Research Article from Macmillan Science Library: Plant Sciences

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Mineral Nutrition and the Transport of Water, Minerals, and Sugars

It had long been known that water, along with dissolved minerals, enters a plant through its roots. Sachs demonstrated that plants do not require soil and can be grown in an entirely liquid medium as long as the medium contains the minerals required for survival. This technique of hydroponics facilitated studies of the mechanisms for mineral uptake by the roots.

Another contribution of Hales was to demonstrate how water is transported in the plant. Hales established that water passes upward from the roots to the leaves, where it is lost to the atmosphere by the process of transpiration. But it was not until 1895 that Henry Dixon and John Joly proposed the cohesion theory to explain how transpiration causes water and dissolved minerals to be pulled upward through the xylem.

The transport of carbohydrates was found to take...

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This section contains 1,082 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Physiology, History Of Encyclopedia Article
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Macmillan Science Library: Plant Sciences
Physiology, History Of from Macmillan Science Library: Plant Sciences. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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