Philosophy of Social Sciences - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 11 pages of information about Philosophy of Social Sciences.
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Metaideology

The social sciences were conceived and pursued, from the very beginning, under the influence of ideals (particularly of scientific objectivity and progress) deriving from the eighteenth-century enlightenment (Hawthorn 1976). The first social scientists were economists and sociologists, as we would call them today, and they were self-consciously concerned about producing something that would count, not as philosophy, not as literature, not as common sense, but as science: as a project faithful to the image forged by natural science.

The scientific intention—the intention to make science—has remained characteristic of work in the social sciences. It puts social scientists, paradoxically, under an obligation of an ideological kind: the obligation to show that the sort of analysis they pursue is of a properly scientific kind. The metaideology of social science interrogates and assesses the ideologies whereby the social sciences try to legitimate what they do...

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This section contains 3,052 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Philosophy of Social Sciences Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Philosophy of Social Sciences from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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