Phenomenology - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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The Movement and Its Origins

"Phenomenology" became the name of a school of philosophy whose first members were found in several German universities in the years before World War I, notably at Göttingen and Munich. Between 1913 and 1930 this group published a series of volumes of phenomenological studies titled Jahrbuch für Philosophie und phänomenologische Forschung, whose editor in chief was Husserl, the most original and most influential thinker of the group. Most of the better-known members of the phenomenological movement—Moritz Geiger, Alexander Pfänder, Max Scheler, and Oscar Becker—were coeditors, at least for a time. Martin Heidegger was another coeditor, but he cannot be counted among the phenomenologists without serious qualifications. Other major figures in the movement were Adolf Reinach and Hedwig Conrad-Martius.

The contributions to the Jahrbuch ranged from Husserl's writings about the foundations...

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This section contains 17,327 words
(approx. 58 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Phenomenology Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Phenomenology from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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