Parsons, Talcott - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 4 pages of information about Parsons, Talcott.
This section contains 1,107 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Parsons, Talcott Encyclopedia Article

Parsons, Talcott

The leading anglophone social theorist between about 1940 and 1965, Talcott Parsons (1902–1979), who was born in Colorado Springs, Colorado, on December 13, was a tireless synthesizer of ideas from classical social and economic theory, functionalist anthropology, psychoanalysis (in which he was trained), and psychology. Though he did not create pathbreaking scientific concepts or procedures, nor contribute formally to ethical reasoning, he did succeed in grafting a robust affection for scientific method (as his generation understood and venerated it) onto the massive edifice of classical social theory in a way that no one else had managed.

Parsons was the youngest child of an early feminist mother (who could trace her ancestry to Jonathan Edwards [1703–1758], the American "divine") and a Congregational minister who became president of Marietta College. Parsons first studied biology at Amherst College, then shifted to political economy of the German-historical type. After a year at the...

(read more)

This section contains 1,107 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Parsons, Talcott Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics
Parsons, Talcott from Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook