Orthodox Judaism - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Religious Practices

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 105 pages of information about Orthodox Judaism.
This section contains 3,415 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
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Judaism: Orthodox Judaism

Overview

Since the nineteenth century the term "Orthodoxy" (Greek orth, "correct," and doxa, "belief") has been applied to the most traditional movement within Judaism. This movement sees itself, compared with other Jewish groups, as the authentic carrier of Jewish tradition since ancient times. Orthodox Jews believe that the Torah (the first five books of the Hebrew Bible, also called the written law) is the word of God and, along with interpretations of the Torah known as the oral law, was divinely revealed to Moses on Mount Sinai. Because of its strict adherence to written and oral law (the latter compiled in the Talmud and codified in the Sholchan Aroch), the Orthodox community often calls itself "Torah-true Judaism."

Scholars generally partition Orthodox Judaism into two major groups: the "ultra-orthodox," or Haredi (awestruck), community and the Modern, or Neo-Orthodox, community. The Haredi community, in turn, can be...

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This section contains 3,415 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Orthodox Judaism Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Religious Practices
Orthodox Judaism from Encyclopedia of Religious Practices. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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