New England Transcendentalism [addendum] - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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Influences on Philosophy

Friedrich Nietzsche read Emerson at three critical points in his life, transcribed passages from Emerson's essays in his journals, and wrote, "Emerson.—Never have I felt so much at home in a book, and in my home" (Goodman 1997, p. 160). Emerson's ideas about nobility, history, friendship, overcoming self-inertia, and self-reliance presage Nietzsche's Untimely Meditations and Thus Spoke Zarathustra. A sentence from Emerson's "History" is the epigraph to the first edition of Nietzsche's Gay Science: "To the poet, to the philosopher, to the saint, all things are friendly and sacred, all events profitable, all days holy, all men divine" (Emerson 1971–, 2: 8).

In the United States, Emerson's stress on action and the future, his humanistic or Kantian portrayal of the role of the self in forming the world, and his focus on the individual chimed with central emphases of William James's pragmatism. John Dewey considered...

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This section contains 1,690 words
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New England Transcendentalism [addendum] from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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