Neo-Kantianism - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 19 pages of information about Neo-Kantianism.
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The Beginnings

Zeller and Fischer

Eduard Zeller (1814–1908), in his Heidelberg lecture, Ueber Bedeutung und Aufgabe der Erkenntnistheorie (published Heidelberg, 1862), called for a return to epistemology; and this, he spelled out explicitly, meant a return to Kant. Kuno Fischer (1824–1907), the greatest historian of philosophy at that time and the teacher of Liebmann, Johannes Volkelt, and Wilhelm Windelband, in 1860 published a monumental book on Kant (Kants Leben und die Grundlagen seiner Lehre, Mannheim and Heidelberg) that presented, in a form still useful although outmoded in details, a picture of Kant that could not but excite interest in and study of Kant. In 1865 Fischer initiated a great controversy with Adolf Trendelenburg on the proper interpretation of Kant's theory of space; this controversy mobilized most of the philosophical public in Germany on one side or the other, including Trendelenburg's pupil Hermann Cohen, who had hitherto concentrated mostly on Plato.

Helmholtz and Lange

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This section contains 5,639 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Neo-Kantianism Encyclopedia Article
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Neo-Kantianism from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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